What has happened to proper nomenclature

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Alan Roehrich
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Alan Roehrich » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:49 am

Then there's always "my dizzy isn't working right with my carby on my eddy manifold".


#-o #-o #-o


I don't even bother to finish reading that.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Walter R. Malik » Sat Aug 12, 2017 10:42 am

Alan Roehrich wrote:Then there's always "my dizzy isn't working right with my carby on my eddy manifold".


#-o #-o #-o


I don't even bother to finish reading that.


That goes right along with "juice" lifters ... :wink:
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby exhaustgases » Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:13 pm

PackardV8 wrote:
exhaustgases wrote:Oh and there is a weight in all rubber bonded harmonic balancers it is the huge ring and would not balance the vibrations if it was not there.


As long as we're discussing correct terminology, that "huge ring" is usually called an inertia ring. It's usually neutral balanced and any external balance weight is most often found cast into the hub.

A harmonic balancer is not to balance the reciprocating loads or centrifugal loads (unless its for external balanced engine) that nice big weight ("inertia ring") is to BALANCE the torsional vibrations.

And remember this.
I found this definition for Balance.
a condition in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions.

And is what dampening is. To counter act or damp or absorb.
People seem to get too hung up on centrifugal balancing forces, that is NOT what a harmonic balancer is for, except in the condition stated above.
Old timer engineers in the mid 50's termed them as harmonic balancers, the term fits. Its just like the fanaticism between "foot pounds of torque" and "pounds feet of torque" both terms mean the exact same thing. Damper - Balancer.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Circlotron » Mon Aug 14, 2017 5:01 pm

When talking about high temperatures and combustion some people say disassociation instead of dissociation.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Dave Koehler » Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:18 am

Circlotron wrote:When talking about high temperatures and combustion some people say disassociation instead of dissociation.

Dang, I have seen it printed that way since the earliest days. Had to look it up. Never realized there is a distinct difference.
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Zmechanic » Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:56 am

exhaustgases wrote: Its just like the fanaticism between "foot pounds of torque" and "pounds feet of torque" both terms mean the exact same thing.


I get a kick out of that one too. The commutative property of multiplication means either way is totally right, but for whatever reason "pound feet" sounds weird to me. I always heard "oil galley" too, until I started branching out and researching from other places, and started seeing "gallery". The rationale behind "gallery" definitely makes it seem like the more appropriate term.

Also, if you want to see a fun trick, hook me up to blood pressure cuff and say the abomination "irregardless" around me and watch the magic as it shoots through the roof! That butchery of a word makes me physically angry.

Oh, and also shock absorbers. Can't forget that one. They are dampeners. #-o

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Dave Koehler » Tue Aug 15, 2017 10:27 am

Shock absorbers I can live with. Ask for road or chassis dampers/dampners/dampeners and expect a blank look.
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Walter R. Malik » Tue Aug 15, 2017 5:49 pm

Zmechanic wrote:
Also, if you want to see a fun trick, hook me up to blood pressure cuff and say the abomination "irregardless" around me and watch the magic as it shoots through the roof! That butchery of a word makes me physically angry.
#-o


"irregardless" is in all the new dictionaries. If an incorrect word gets used enough ... it becomes an actual word.
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Dave Koehler » Tue Aug 15, 2017 5:55 pm

How about this one. Melee spelled May Lay.
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby RevTheory » Wed Aug 16, 2017 6:07 pm

Irregardless is definitely grounds for a blood pressure spike, lol.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby joe 90 » Sun Aug 20, 2017 3:52 am

How about "spring pressure".

That one comes up on here many times.






Springs don't have pressure.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby exhaustgases » Sun Aug 20, 2017 4:10 pm

joe 90 wrote:How about "spring pressure".

That one comes up on here many times.






Springs don't have pressure.


Not until they are loaded and then since its a spring causing the load its called? But then a metallurgist may argue the point that yes the material is loaded, that is what makes metal what it is, the internal or molecular stresses.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby Walter R. Malik » Sun Aug 20, 2017 8:21 pm

exhaustgases wrote:
joe 90 wrote:How about "spring pressure".

That one comes up on here many times.






Springs don't have pressure.


Not until they are loaded and then since its a spring causing the load its called? But then a metallurgist may argue the point that yes the material is loaded, that is what makes metal what it is, the internal or molecular stresses.


Force and Pressure are completely different but, get used incorrectly for the same meaning all the time
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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby joe 90 » Mon Aug 21, 2017 12:56 am

Pressure is force per unit area.

Springs have "force".

They don't have "area" so they don't have pressure.


They're measured in pounds or in newtons.
NOT pounds per square inch.

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Re: What has happened to proper nomenclature

Postby joe 90 » Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:40 am

But a spring will exert a pressure on the washer under it, and on the cylinder head.The retainer and keepers too.
If you wanted to know the "real" spring pressure, you'd measure the load at whatever height(spring tester), measure the area where the spring contacts the washer(or retainer, or keepers), then divide.

But you wouldn't get what you might think you get.
That might make a good topic?


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